Resource acquisition is the stage most underrated and most frequently slighted by busy and confident change agents, too easily deluding themselves  that they know it all already.  IGNORE THIS STEP AT YOUR PERIL.

Think you already have all the resources that could be useful?  YOU DON'T

Think that this project is so innovative that past experience is irrelevant? IT ISN'T! NO PROJECT IS EVER SO NEW AND CREATIVE THAT IT CAN'T BE IMPROVED SUBSTANTIALLY BY APPLYING INFORMATION FROM THE PAST

Think there is no relevant knowledge from other systems that applies to what you are doing with this client? THAT IS NEVER THE CASE!

Feel that other resources are too hard to go after?: WRONG! IT IS ALWAYS WORTHWHILE TO TRY, AND, IN THE DIGITAL AGE, IT IS INCREASINGLY EASY AND INEXPENSIVE TO GAIN ACCESS!

The task of information retrieval can be handled with a minimum of effort if searchers think about what they need before they start and set an acquisition strategy that makes sense in terms of their needs.

STAGE 3 is divided into four sections. Section 1 lists the major purposes of acquisition. These purposes can be summarized in seven concepts comprising the acronym "D-A-E-T-E-I-M." Section 2  suggests a strategy for homing in on specific solutions. In Section 3 considers the different kinds of tools that are usually available for any acquisition strategy. Finally, in Section 4 we consider how to build and maintain a permanent resource acquisition capability.

 For the change agent, acquiring knowledge about the process of change may be the most important type of resource acquisition. As you read through STAGE 3, keep in mind that we are only discussing resource acquisition, not resource evaluation or utilization; these will be the topics of subsequent chapters. Here we are concerned with how to get it, not what to do with it once we have it.



Quotables


On June 1, 1965, Robert Manry set out from Falmouth, Massachusetts, in a 13-foot sailboat to cross the Atlantic to Falmouth, England. Manry was confident that he could make it, not because he was foolhardy or exceptionally brave, but because he had done a very thorough and systematic job of resource retrieval. He had read the accounts of past voyages; he knew the weather patterns, the currents, and the shipping traffic. He knew what food, navigational gear, emergency equip­ment, and clothing to provide for himself, and above all he knew his boat. He knew what it could take and how it would behave in various condi­tions. Manry made a successful crossing largely because he had done such a complete job of resource acquisition.

Stage 3: ACQUIRE


With an adequate definition in hand, the change agent and the system can begin to reach out for resources that might be relevant. "Resources" come in many forms: people, finances, space, time, technology, and knowledge , especially knowledge of other change efforts, successful and otherwise. Just plain ideas can also be useful resources.